A human-computer partnership: The tutor/child/computer triangle promoting the acquisition of early literacy skills

This study involved the analysis of the complex interactions that take place between tutors and preschool children using a computer during early literacy tutoring sessions. Eight five-year-old pre- and early-readers attending a childcare centre participated in daily 20-minute tutoring sessions for two weeks. The literacy software (a beta version) was especially designed to guide tutors while working one-on-one with elementary school students falling into the lower 30% of reading achievement (i.e., at-risk). Parent surveys, videotaped tutor/child sessions, independent observer data, and tutor reports yielded rich descriptions of the tutor/child/computer process. Rigorous grounded theory analyses generated three comprehensive themes: rapport, motivation, and scaffolding. The first focused on interpersonal issues, the latter two on teaching/learning. Implications for practice for reading and literacy instructional differntiation are discussed.

Author: 
Schmid, R., Miodrag, N., & Di Francesco, N.
Year: 
2008
Source: 
Journal of Research on Technology in Education, Vol. 41 (1), 63-84.
Type: 
Related Research
Content Area: 
reading
Grade Level: 
birth to preschool
early elementary
IDEA Disability Category: 
autism
emotional disturbance
major-other health impairment
specific learning disability
speech or language impairment
Instructional Support: 
opportunities to learn concepts
practice and reinforcement activities
National Reading Panel Standards: 
comprehension
fluency
vocabulary
English Language Arts: 
Reading: Foundational Skills
Reading: Literature
Reading: Informational Text
Language